Dicasalarin Cove, Baler (Day 2)

Dicasalarin Cove

Dicasalarin Cove

If you were in Baler, it would be a sin not to visit Dicasalarin, a beach cove 15-16km away from Sabang. On day 2 of our trip to Baler, our mission was to bike to the cove in the morning, be back by lunch, and leave for Manila by 3pm… non of that happened. #Lol!

That morning I woke up early to see the famous sunrise of Baler, did some rounds on my japa beads, then had some coffee… it seemed like a perfect and steady morning when suddenly, Louie, our friend/local host, arrived on his motorbike and interrupted our serenity. “Let’s go!” he said.

Without talking about the plan, we quickly packed our gears, hopped on our bikes and followed him to town. Within 5 minutes, we reached the HQ of Aurora Biker’s Club, where 20+ mountain bikers (as in bikers on mountain bikes) waited for us ready to roll. Our destination, Dicasalarin Cove.

The day before riding to the cove, Louie told us that the cove was only 16kms away from Sabang, and that if we rode out at 7am, we would be back by 10:30am, just in time for us to cook, eat lunch, and get ready to leave for Manila by 3pm. What he didn’t tell us was that we would climb up a mountain first before we got to the cove. It was the kind of climb that made me swear every minute and made me question my very existence every second. No kidding, I would never climb that peak again unless I rode a habal-habal or any form of motorized vehicle.

One thing I learned from this ride – Aurora Bikers are the true hardcore riders!

After an excruciating 1 hour hike, we reached the peak of Dica, where we found PAGASA / “Hope”.

PAGASA rooftop.

PAGASA rooftop overlooking Dicasalarin Cove.

From the peak, we descended to the cove. Naturally, what you descend, you must ascend.

From the peak, we descended to the cove. Naturally, what you descend, you must ascend. Non-stop of walking with our bikes.

20 minutes later, we arrived at the foot of the cove, finally! What to see in Dicasalarin:

  1. The Artist Village
  2. The bath house
  3. The cave
  4. The lighthouse (172 steps to get there)
  5. The creamy white sand beach
  6. A bathing spot where the river meets the ocean

By the time we had to leave Dica, it was already 1pm. The heat was unbearable and we still had to hike back to the peak again (not fun anymore).

Dicasalarin Cove

Goodbye Dicasalarin Cove

We arrived at our kubo at 4pm. The bus tickets were sold out. We decided to rent a van to bring us to Cabanatuan and took a bus to Manila from there.

We arrived at our kubo at 4pm.

So how did we get home? We rented a van from Baler to Cabanatuan (P2,700), then took a bus to manila from there. We left Baler at 9pm. We reached home at 4am, Monday.

What an epic weekend!

Calatagan Weekend

Another epic weekend with biker buddies in Burot, Calatagan.

With my gal, Melissa Sambajon, travel extraordinaire.

With my gal, Melissa Sambajon, travel extraordinaire.

Take a bus from Coastal Mall Provincial Bus Terminal to Calatagan:

  • Celyrosa Express leaves every hour.
  • Non-aircon bus until 9am, after 9am, AC bus is available.
  • P140/head
  • Non-stop 3-4 hr trip
For P150-P200, a trike can take you to Burot beach. We rented one to carry our bags.

For P150-P200, a trike can take you to Burot beach. We rented one for our bags.

Our first stop was the nearby market where we bought:

  • Drinking water
  • Food & Snacks

Make sure to buy everything you need because everything else in Burot is more expensive.

We grabbed a quick bite at the market, then pedaled our way to the beach (estimate 5KM). If you’re planning to bike to Burot, ensure that you have good wheels. The road is rough and full of sharp rocks. At one point, I had to walk because it was too bumpy for my small wheels.

The famous Burot sunset.

The famous Burot sunset.

Camp site

Camp site

Tent is the only option for accommodations in Burot. If you don’t have a tent, you can rent one for P300 – P500 depending on the capacity. Best to bring your own because the island can run out of tents during peak season.

For only P100/head one can go sandbar hopping. We went to 3 sandbars. If you really want to swim, take this offer.

There's always time for a selfie!

There’s always time for a selfie!

Loving the beach life!

Loving the beach life!

After 2 hours, we returned to our camp. When leaving your campsite, make sure to lock your tent and take your valuables with you. Rumor has it that visitors have lost stuff. In our case, we left Jen Mai behind. Well, she volunteered. Thanks dear!

Chef Melissa in her element.

Chef Melissa in her element.

Melissa makes the best vegetarian pasta with her ever reliable camping cook set.

Melissa makes the best vegetarian pasta with her ever reliable camping cook set.

Part of camping is preparing and cooking your own food. Master chef Melissa got it covered.

The next day, we biked to the lighthouse in Cape Santiago, about 10KM away from Burot.

We made it!

We made it!

Side trip: The Stilts. Normally, you have to pay a minimum amount of P350/head to enter The Stilts, lucky for us, we didn’t have to. I’m not really sure why… I think the guard had a crush on Jen Mai (Hahaha).

Thank you Calatagan!

Thank you, The Stilts!

We had to get extra seats for our bikes. The AC bus has a smaller compartment than the Non-AC bus.

Thank you Calatagan!

Thank you Calatagan!

More photos here!

 

Conquering Valencia

May 07, 2013, Valencia, Dumaguete City, Negros Oriental. An adventure  like no other with cycling buddy, Tina dela Cruz. Highlights were visiting the market, breakfast at the boulevard, bathing in the river, and conquering Valencia.

Buying breakfast and souvenir at the Dumaguete Public Market

Buying breakfast and souvenir at the Dumaguete Public Market

Looking for local breakfast

Looking for local breakfast

Tina having some local breakfast made.

Tina having some local sandwich made.

Riding with my bayong and boom box

Riding with my bayong and boom box

On our way out, this "ATM" machine made us very happy.

On our way out, this “ATM” machine made us very happy.

Going local is always the best.

For me and Tina, going local is always the best way to go.

Breakfast at the boulevard

Breakfast at the boulevard

A morning to behold

A morning to behold

Immediately after breakfast, we pedaled our way to Mt. Valencia

Immediately after breakfast, we pedaled our way to Mt. Valencia

The road ahead

The road ahead

On our way to Valencia, we passed by this river/stream

On our way to Valencia, we passed by this river/stream

We crossed the bridge and took a dip

We crossed the bridge and took a dip

The water was too beautiful to ignore.

The water was too beautiful to ignore.

The water was cold and clean. First time river bathers. What an experience!

The water was cold and clean. First time river bathers. What an experience!

A few meters from us were local women washing their clothes and bathing their children.

A few meters from us were local women washing their clothes and bathing their children.

Up up we go

Up up we go

Bike weather

Surrounded by green.

Meeting an american cyclist on the road. Tim has lived in Dumaguete for 25 years and has a Filipina wife.

Meeting an american cyclist on the road. Tim has lived in Dumaguete for 25 years and has a Filipina wife.

When we got hungry or thirsty, we stopped. There was no rushing. We made sure we tasted and experienced local delights on our journey.

When we got hungry or thirsty, we stopped. There was no rushing. We made sure we tasted and experienced local delights on our journey.

I got too tired so we hitched a ride to Valencia town proper.

I got too tired so we hitched a ride to Valencia town proper.

Thank you Manong! Apparently, the muti-cab we rode was the property of Valencia municipality. So we got a free ride!

Thank you Manong! Apparently, the muti-cab we rode was the property of Valencia municipality. So we got a free ride!

Here was where we left our bikes. A carinderia just in front of the plaza. We just knew that our bikes would be safe here.

Here was where we left our bikes. A carinderia just in front of the plaza. We just knew that our bikes would be safe here.

The road to the Writer's Village was not going to be flat and smooth so we were advised to take the habal habal.

The road to the Writer’s Village was not going to be flat and smooth so we were advised to take the habal habal.

The road to the Writer's Village was misty and cold, they call this place the little Baguio of Dumaguete City.

The road to the Writer’s Village was misty and cold, they call this place the little Baguio of Dumaguete City.

Finally, after about 15kms of habal habal ride, we arrived at the Writer's Village.

Finally, after about 15kms of habal habal ride, we arrived at the Writer’s Village.

the Writer's Village

The Writer’s Village

The Writer's Village

The Writer’s Village

Meeting up with Tracy.

Meeting up with Tracy.

Then it was time to say goodbye.

Then it was time to say goodbye.

We took a habal habal back to Valencia town proper, and of course our bikes were still there. Had lunch at a local carinderia, then pedaled our way back to Dumaguete City, about 12kms of downhill. Fun! Thank you Tina for the unforgettable experience.

We took a habal habal back to Valencia town proper, and of course our bikes were still there. Had lunch at a local carinderia, then pedaled our way back to Dumaguete City, about 12kms of downhill. Fun! Thank you Tina for the unforgettable experience.

Thank you to the gentle people of Dumaguete city. We shall return for sure! More PHOTOS.

CMR January

This year’s first CMR by Firefly Brigade was a success. It was nice to see old-timer and new bikers again after the Holidays. I believe it was well attended because everybody missed everybody and maybe also because a lot of new riders made it their New Year’s resolution to be more active and healthier this year. It was a great start. Hopefully we continue to see this kind of number every month. The more the merrier. (CMR Schedule)

Assembly point. Greenhills Shopping Centre.

Assembly point. Greenhills Shopping Centre.

At 7am, Jeans and I arrived at the assembly point. During the assembly, Tina DC, the Firefly Brigade President made some announcements and gave an orientation on road safety and road ethics. Shortly after that, the ride commenced.

(Photo by Al Castillo)

(Photo by Al Castillo)

CMR January 2013

During CMRs, women are encouraged to stay in front to pace the peloton. (Photo by Al Castillo)

CMR January 2013

Doc Arman and Stephen on their folding bikes. (Photo by Al Castillo)

Emergency

Emergency

During the ride, Tina’s fender encountered a problem, thankfully many bikers were more than willing to help.

CMR January 2013

It was a perfect bike weather. (Photo by Al Castillo)

CMR January 2013

On our way to Binondo, Manila. (Photo by Al Castillo)

CMR January 2013

(Photo by Al Castillo)

CMR January 2013

Waiting for the peloton to regroup on the bridge. (Photo by Al Castillo)

Streets of Manila.

Streets of Manila.

Passing by Luneta

Passing by Luneta

Marshals on duty.

Marshals on duty.

What I admire most about the Firefly Brigade’s monthly CMR is that they have very committed marshals who make sure that all riders are safe and that no one is left behind.

CMR January 2013

The photographer, Al Castillo.

(Photo by Tina DC)

(Photo by Tina DC)

Kalesas roaming the streets of Old Manila.

IMG_1990

Binondo, the final destination.

IMG_1994

Folding bikes.

Advocafe, a new vegetarian and bike-friendly cafe in Manila.

Advocafe, a new vegetarian and bike-friendly cafe in Manila.

After the CMR, we had lunch at this new cafe near Roxas. Check out Advocafe.

FACTS ABOUT CMR:

  • CMR means Critical Mass Ride
  • Organized by the Firefly Brigade
  • It’s FREE, no registration fee.
  • Wearing a helmet is highly encouraged
  • Open to all kinds of bikers (newbies or oldies)
  • Usually 20km – 25km distance
  • Slow and easy pace
  • Mostly flat roads
  • Very few inclines

See you again fireflies. Ride safe. Cheers to a healthier lifestyle.

The Great Zambales Experience

The day I found out about a Zambales ride being cooked up, I got excited immediately. I can’t remember ever going to Zambales as a child and from what I heard, it’s a nature trip. True to what they said, Zamba is the ideal destination for nature and beach lovers.

Zambales is a province of the Philippines located in the Central Luzon region. Its capital is Iba. Zambales borders Pangasinan to the north, Tarlac and Pampanga to the east, Bataan to the south and the South China Sea to the west. With a land area of 3,714.40 km2, Zambales is the second largest among the seven provinces of Central Luzon. The province is noted for its mangoes, which are abundant from January to April.

Zambales is served by the Subic Bay International Airport, which is located in Cubi Point in the Subic Bay Freeport Zone. The Freeport Zone is host to many tourist attractions which include casinos, beach resorts, parks, beachside huts and cottages and historical sites.  -Wikipedia

Photo by Jeans Cequina

Photo by Jeans Cequina

It’s one of those moments that I am glad I invested on a Flamingo London folding bike (folds like a Brompton bike). It’s very compact and it can perfectly fit in the leg space of a taxi.

Squeezing in 3 ladies and 3 folding bikes in 1 taxi. Quite complicated but it was fun.

Squeezing in 3 ladies and 3 folding bikes in 1 taxi. Quite complicated but it was fun.

My girlfriends, Tina and Jeans met up in Quezon City and the 3 of us took a cab to get to the Caloocan branch of Victory Liner where we met up with the rest of the folding bikers.

Caloocan bus terminal.

Caloocan bus terminal.

Photo by Tonnette Jacinto

Bus fares. Photo by Tonnette Jacinto

Getting to Zambales from Manila doesn’t really cost a lot. The best bus and terminal to take is Victory Liner Caloocan. This branch offers more option in terms of timing. The last trip leaves at 12 midnight.

Caloocan bus terminal.

Caloocan bus terminal.

All our bikes are packed are we're ready to go.Photo by Tonnette Jacinto

All our bikes are packed are we’re ready to go.
Photo by Tonnette Jacinto

The compartment of the bus was not enough for all the bikes, good thing they allowed us to bring it inside the passenger's area. Photo by Tonnette Jacinto

The compartment of the bus was not enough for all the bikes, good thing they allowed us to bring it inside the passenger’s area.
Photo by Tonnette Jacinto

Waiting at the terminal was more exciting for the other passengers. Seeing a group of bikers with their folding bikes just wasn’t the usual thing they’d see at the terminal. Some even approached us and asked if we were serious about our trip.

Caloocan bus terminal.

Caloocan bus terminal.

With my girlfriends, the “Mamech”, Melissa, Jeans, Tina, and Carol. Bike rides are always more fun with the mamech!

Victory Liner, Iba, Zambales Terminal.Photo by Tonnette Jacinto

Victory Liner, Iba, Zambales Terminal.
Photo by Tonnette Jacinto

The bus ride only took 4 hours from Caloocan, Manila to Iba, Zambales. Personally I think we left Manila too early but because we didn’t have a choice, we had to leave at 12mn. The last trip of Victory Liner to Iba was only 12mn. Upon arrival, we unloaded all our things and folding bikes and there we met up with the rest of the group and our hosts, Ms. Aleth and  Sir Mario.

Jollibee BreakfastPhoto by Tonnette Jacinto

Jollibee Breakfast
Photo by Tonnette Jacinto

From the terminal, we biked our way to Jollibee (about 3km away), the only breakfast place open at 6am in Iba. It was also there that we met up with more folding bikers, Stephen and Thanny.

Free shirts!Photo by Tonnette Jacinto

Free shirts!
Photo by Tonnette Jacinto

The ride started immediately after breakfast. Every pedal was breathtaking. A lot of trees, well paved flat roads, nice weather, and most of all great company.

The beautiful landscape of Zambales.

The beautiful landscape of Zambales.

The beautiful landscape of Zambales.

The beautiful landscape of Zambales.

Riding with my folding bike buddies. Special thanks to Folding Bike Pilipinas and Polkit for organizing this amazing adventure!

Rolling in Zambales

A run down house along the road.

A run down house along the road.

Riding inside the town.

Inside streets

Just about 15kms away from the city, we reached an Aeta Village where we stopped to meet and greet the kids and the rest of the community. We were also fortunate to be able to give a little of happiness to them. A local vendor of buko ice cream came and we all pitched in to give away to all the kids in the community.

Sir Mario requesting the kids to fall in line.

Sir Mario requesting the kids to fall in line. Photo by Tonnette Jacinto

Falling in line for buko ice cream.

Falling in line for buko ice cream. Photo by Melissa Sambajon

Buko ice cream for the kids.

Buko ice cream for the kids. Photo by Melissa Sambajon

There were two lines, one for the boys and one for the girls. Tina and I took turns giving buko ice cream to the girls. What a great feeling to be able to give them simple joys.

Locals

Locals

With the Aeta kids.

With the Aeta kids.

With the Aeta kids.

With the Aeta kids.

The turquoise blue church inside the Aeta community.

The turquoise blue church inside the Aeta community.

Aeta Community

Aeta Community

Shortly after visiting the Aeta Community, we continued with the ride. Just about 10kms from the community, we “pedaled” our way to a church on top of a hill. There were 3 inclines, 2 of them minor but the last climb was the killer, where most of the riders dismounted.

Short break after the two minor inclines.

Short break after the two minor inclines. Photo from Melissa Sambajon

The last hill.

The last climb.

Church on top of the hill.

Church on top of the hill.

Top of the hill.

Top of the hill.

After pedaling our way up to the hill, we went back down to visit another church for prayers and bike blessing. The 2nd church was a newer church than the one on top of the hill.

The church at the bottom of the hill.Photo by Melissa Sambajon

The church at the bottom of the hill.
Photo by Melissa Sambajon

Resting while waiting for Father.Photo by Melissa Sambajon

Resting while waiting for Father. With Tina, Jeans, and Carol (The Mamech).
Photo by Melissa Sambajon

Bike blessing and prayer for the safety of the riders. Thank you Father.Photo by Melissa Sambajon

Bike blessing and prayer for the safety of the riders. Thank you Father.
Photo by Melissa Sambajon

After the ride, we went straight to a local restaurant to have lunch. It was quite a long ride back especially because it was getting hotter and most of us were already tired. I think we pedaled about 40kms in total. Exhausting but it was all worth it.

The last stop of the ride. Finally we get to rest and eat lunch.Photo by Melissa Sambajon

The last stop of the ride. Finally we get to rest and eat lunch.
Photo by Melissa Sambajon

After lunch and a nice cup of local brewed coffee, we again pedaled our way to a resort nearby where we parked our folding bikes. It was also during this time that we said our goodbyes to most of the bikers who were leaving for Manila that same day. Those who stayed behind awaited a greater adventure in Potipot Island.

Before heading to the island, we stopped by a nearby supermarket to buy food, drinks, and other supplies. We were told that the island didn’t have electricity and sari-sari stores.

A quick stop at the supermarket for supplies.

A quick stop at the supermarket for supplies. Photo by Melissa Sambajon

Gentle breeze and warm placid waters of the South China Sea welcome travelers to this charming and peaceful little tropical island off coast of the town of Candelaria in the northern part of Zambales. Literally meaning “small white island”, Potipot Island boasts of lush array of coconut, mango, kamachile and talisay trees, coral shells, hermits’ crabs, starfishes, and the most spectacular sunsets ever witnessed in this side of town. And if the weather is just right, dolphins will honor you with their presence. This untamed and untouched island makes an ideal camping and picnic spot.

One such place is suited with Candelaria and is called Potipot Island. It’s the nearest island from mainland Zambales where tourists or travelers can simply rent a boat from any of the resorts.

After a 15 minute boat ride from the shore, I found myself on a small and uninhabited Potipot Island, an unspoiled haven that is completely surrounded with cream sand beaches and filled with trees. Many have enjoyed spending a day here, basking around the sun, enjoying its waters and solitude it brings.

Touring the entire island only took me 30 minutes where every inch of the shore is covered by the same cream-sand beach. Taking a closer look, I marveled at the distinct, pink-tainted shoreline that I haven’t seen anywhere else before. Potipot Island owes this to the rose-tinted corals shed and washed along its shores, adding charm that makes Potipot Island unique from other islands.

As there are only trees and sand in Potipot Island, tourists who want to experience its grandeur can stay at resorts in mainland Zambales and rent a boat to take them to the island. Tourists can claim the island for a day and reflect on Potipot island’s waters. Commune with nature and take in all the beauty of what an unspoiled island brings, for it offers a rare experience one would not normally find or afford.

(Source: http://tourism.zambalesnow.com/)

That's Potipot Island. Just 5 minutes away from the mainland.

That’s Potipot Island. Just 5 minutes away from the mainland.

On our way to Paradise.Photo by Melissa Sambajon

On our way to Paradise.
Photo by Melissa Sambajon

Speed boat happiness.Photo by Melissa Sambajon

Speed boat to happiness.
Photo by Melissa Sambajon

Group picture upon arrival at Potipot. Unfortunately most of the troop left. Only 8 of us stayed overnight.Photo from Melissa Sambajon

Group picture upon arrival at Potipot. Unfortunately most of the bikers left. Only 8 of us stayed overnight.
Photo from Melissa Sambajon

The Campsite at Potipot Island.

The Campsite at Potipot Island.

We arrived at Potipot around 4pm. The sun was fast setting. So after a quick dip, we went straight to another corner of the island where we experienced an unforgettable sunset moment. I was joined by Tina, Melissa, Jeans, and Mark.

Beach time.Photo by Melissa Sambajon

Beach time.
Photo by Melissa Sambajon

"Pag mulat ng mata, langit nakatawa sa Potipot." -mamech. (Sing it!)Photo from Melissa Sambajon

“Pag mulat ng mata, langit nakatawa sa Potipot.” -mamech. (Sing it!)
Photo from Melissa Sambajon

In the evening, things got even better. The island was lit by the full moonlight. The setting was perfect for poi dancing. Jeans was prepared. She actually brought her fire poi kit and she performed for us, the cast-aways. It was another unforgettable moment for everyone who stayed behind especially for our friend, Stephen, who was seeing a fire dance performance for the first time. Thank you Jeans for mesmerizing us. (The hunt for kerosene was so worth it.)

Jeans, the poi dancer.Photo by Melissa Sambajon

Jeans, the poi dancer.
Photo by Melissa Sambajon

Sleeping under the moonlight.Photo by Melissa Sambajon

Sleeping under the moonlight.
Photo by Melissa Sambajon

We slept on the beach under the moonlight. The weather was not too cold. A malong or sarong was enough to keep us warm.Photo by Melissa Sambajon

We slept on the beach under the moonlight. The weather was not too cold. A malong or sarong was enough to keep us warm.
Photo by Melissa Sambajon

Time stops when you're in Potipot.

Time stops when you’re in Potipot. We woke up to this sight.

Breakfast will never be the same again.

Breakfast will never be the same again. The early risers, Melissa and Tina prepared breakfast for everyone. Thank you mamech!

Breakfast by the beach.

Breakfast by the beach.

The morning after. More  beach time.

The morning after. More beach time.

Our lovely host, Aleth Velasquez arrived at 9am to pick us up with the speed boat to bring us back to the mainland. Then we rode the rear of the pick up truck to the resort where we left our folding bikes. Shortly after arriving at our destination, we packed our bags and bikes into Sir Thanny’s car. Before heading to Manila, we stopped by a local restaurant to eat lunch, then another stop in Subic for coffee, and then our final stop was at Mr. Kebab’s Place for dinner.

Off we go home.

Off we go home.

When in Zambales, go to Rizal St.

When in Zambales, go to Rizal St.

When in Zambales, go to Rizal St. where you can buy pastillas for pasalubong.

When in Zambales, go to Rizal St. where you can buy pastillas for pasalubong.

The Zambales experience was amazing. I would like to thank Ms. Aleth Velasquez and Sir Mario Velasquez for being such great hosts in Zambales, to the Folding Bike Pilipinas and Polkit group for organizing the ride, to Sir Thanny for allowing us, the Mamech, to hitch a ride back to Manila, to the Gov of Zambales, for sponsoring our Potipot experience, to all those who participated and supported ride, and most especially to the Mamech for making it more unforgettable. Until the next ride again. Happy New Year!

last stop before heading home

Mr. Kebab, where we ate dinner and our last stop before going separate ways. Photo by Melissa Sambajon

Projected Expenses:

P684 – Round trip bus fare with Victory Liner (Caloocan)
P100 – Potipot Island entrance fee
P500 – Round trip boat ride good for 8pax (Day trip)
P500 – Local meals and drinks (Lunch & Dinner)
P1,784 – TOTAL

Credits:
Photos by Nityalila Saulo, Melissa Sambajon, and Tonnette Jacinto

Picnic By The Bay

An impromptu ride with the #mamech. Bycicles, picnic, and sunset watching by the bay.

Mobile music. My very own bike speakers on my folding bike. More fun with music, definitely.

Mobile music. My very own bike speakers on my folding bike. More fun with music, definitely.

For small group rides, it’s always nice to bring bike speakers.

"You are not stuck in traffic, you are traffic."

“You are not stuck in traffic, you are traffic.”

After picking up Tina, we met up with Mel, Jeans, and Jean's Brother, Ta. Then we were off to Manila Bay.

After picking up Tina, we met up with Mel, Jeans, and Jean’s Brother, Ta. Then we were off to Manila Bay.

Picnic spot.

Picnic spot.

Vegetarian snacks.

Vegetarian snacks.

Just before picking a picnic spot, the girls and I stopped by a convenient store and grabbed some snacks to eat with Melissa’s home-made tomato salsa and dip.

#mamech Mel.

#mamech Mel.

That’s Melissa, our very own Chef!

This is how we roll.

This is how we roll.

We prefer riding with our folding bikes in the city just cause it’s easier to maneuver in the traffic. Also, we can attach baskets and bags to it for all our knick-knacks.

Hello sunset!

Hello sunset!

The sun is saying goodbye. It was a great day indeed.

May 2012

Our little patch of island in this urban jungle.

Our little patch of island in this urban jungle.

Sunset. People.

Sunset. People.

Hippie Birthday

So apparently, my #mamech have been planning this surprise birthday brunch party for a month with my #papech Miko. It was a big success! I love you girls! Thank you very much for a memorable birthday.

So apparently, my #mamech have been planning this surprise birthday brunch party for a month with my #papech Miko. It was a big success! I love you girls! Thank you very much for a memorable birthday.

With Bilog, Ruth, Tina, Jeans, and Mel. I love my #mamech!